Giant Gippsland Earthworm

Did The Earth Move For You Too?

If you are out wandering along the creeks and slopes of South and West Gippsland, don’t be startled if you hear a loud, gurgling sound like this beneath your feet:
Sir David Attenborough gets up close and personal with a Giant Gippsland Earthworm Giant Gippsland Earthworm Giant Gippsland Earthworm
Dig a little deeper and unearth some of the secrets of the Giant Gippsland Earthworm by exploring this website. Find out how you can identify and manage GGE habitat on your farm, and be part of this exciting new project.
Site content written by Dr. Beverley Van Praagh (BSc. PhD.) who has been studying the Giant Gippsland Earthworm for the past 30 years.
Website by VP-IT
All photographs © Dr. Beverley Van Praagh, Invert-Eco unless otherwise stated. No image may be saved, copied, reproduced or distributed without prior permission from the copyright owner.

LATEST NEWS

FUNDING AVAILABLE NOW for GGE site assessments under the BRP project. Return EOI to register Expression of Interest. Biodiversity Response Planning Field Day Interview - Vimeo New Giant Gippsland Earthworm Videos: 1) moving within it’s underground burrow - YouTube 2) flooded out of it’s burrow - YouTube GGE Revegetation Demonstration Sites - 5 years on (.pdf) To The Land Down Under, In More Ways Than One, You Could Say, It’s A Whole Lotta Worm READ ALL LATEST  PROJECT NEWS - Ripley’s Believe It Or Not! Article The 3-metre Worm You Will Never Have Seen - Look At Me Podcast

Farmers As Custodians

It’s not just national parks and nature reserves that are important for protecting our threatened plants and animals; farmland also plays a role in biodiversity conservation. This is imperative for threatened species such as the Giant Gippsland Earthworm, where the farmers of South and West Gippsland are the custodians of the majority of its habitat. Working together and managing farms in ways that protect GGE habitat will help ensure that GGEs continue to survive and thrive. Victorian Government’s Biodiversity Response Planning Project (BRP) In 2018, a partnership project between DELWP Gippsland, Federation University, Gippsland Water, Latrobe Catchment Landcare Network, and South Gippsland Landcare Network was awarded a Grant under the State Government’s Biodiversity Response Planning Project (BRP) to promote the conservation of four species of threatened invertebrates found in the western end of the Strzelecki Ranges. It builds on an earlier Federal Government project “Building Capability To Manage GGE Habitat On Farms”. The project has two aims: investigate the potential of eDNA to assist in identifying different species of burrowing crayfish in the field; and work with landowners to ensure that habitats of Giant Gippsland Earthworm and burrowing crayfish are protected on rural properties. This involves undertaking appropriate revegetation and providing support for on-ground works such as deer control and fencing where required.
Click any image to enlarge
Please click play below to listen
This is the sound of a giant worm squelching its way in the darkness along its wet burrow. Although Australia has over 1000 species of native earthworms, Gippsland is home to possibly the largest and undoubtedly the most famous of all earthworms - the Giant Gippsland Earthworm. This gigantic earthworm has had an audience with a King, featured in festivals, (Moomba, Karmai and a variety show) and stared alongside Sir David Attenborough in the BBC’s 2005 tv series Life in the Undergrowth. Despite all this attention, many of its habits and behaviours remain secret, hidden beneath the clay pastures of Gippsland.
Giant Gippsland Earthworms are a protected species in Victoria. They are very fragile animals and digging up these worms to view them or handling them incorrectly is likely to result in their death. We do not encourage any digging up or handling of these worms unnecessarily. The best way to conserve these worms is to protect their habitat and leave them in their underground homes.
Invert-Eco

Giant Gippsland Earthworm

Did The Earth Move For You Too?

If you are out wandering along the creeks and slopes of South and West Gippsland, don’t be startled if you hear a loud, gurgling sound like this beneath your feet:

LATEST NEWS

FUNDING AVAILABLE NOW for GGE site assessments under the BRP project. Return EOI to register Expression of Interest. Biodiversity Response Planning Field Day Interview - Vimeo New Giant Gippsland Earthworm Videos: 1) moving within it’s underground burrow - YouTube 2) flooded out of it’s burrow - YouTube GGE Revegetation Demonstration Sites - 5 years on (.pdf) To The Land Down Under, In More Ways Than One, You Could Say, It’s A Whole Lotta Worm - Ripley’s Believe It Or Not! Article The 3-metre Worm You Will Never Have Seen - Look At Me Podcast
Sir David Attenborough gets up close and personal with a Giant Gippsland Earthworm Giant Gippsland Earthworm Giant Gippsland Earthworm
Dig a little deeper and unearth some of the secrets of the Giant Gippsland Earthworm by exploring this website. Find out how you can identify and manage GGE habitat on your farm, and be part of this exciting new project.
Site content written by Dr. Beverley Van Praagh (BSc. PhD.) who has been studying the Giant Gippsland Earthworm for the past 30 years.

Farmers As Custodians

It’s not just national parks and nature reserves that are important for protecting our threatened plants and animals; farmland also plays a role in biodiversity conservation. This is imperative for threatened species such as the Giant Gippsland Earthworm, where the farmers of South and West Gippsland are the custodians of the majority of its habitat. Working together and managing farms in ways that protect GGE habitat will help ensure that GGEs continue to survive and thrive. Victorian Government’s Biodiversity Response Planning Project (BRP) In 2018, a partnership project between DELWP Gippsland, Federation University, Gippsland Water, Latrobe Catchment Landcare Network, and South Gippsland Landcare Network was awarded a Grant under the State Government’s Biodiversity Response Planning Project (BRP) to promote the conservation of four species of threatened invertebrates found in the western end of the Strzelecki Ranges. It builds on an earlier Federal Government project “Building Capability To Manage GGE Habitat On Farms”. The project has two aims: investigate the potential of eDNA to assist in identifying different species of burrowing crayfish in the field; and work with landowners to ensure that habitats of Giant Gippsland Earthworm and burrowing crayfish are protected on rural properties. This involves undertaking appropriate revegetation and providing support for on- ground works such as deer control and fencing where required.
Click any image to enlarge
All photographs © Dr. Beverley Van Praagh, Invert-Eco unless otherwise stated. No image may be saved, copied, reproduced or distributed without prior permission from the copyright owner.
Website by VP-IT
Please click play below to listen
This is the sound of a giant worm squelching its way in the darkness along its wet burrow. Although Australia has over 1000 species of native earthworms, Gippsland is home to possibly the largest and undoubtedly the most famous of all earthworms - the Giant Gippsland Earthworm. This gigantic earthworm has had an audience with a King, featured in festivals, (Moomba, Karmai and a variety show) and stared alongside Sir David Attenborough in the BBC’s 2005 tv series Life in the Undergrowth. Despite all this attention, many of its habits and behaviours remain secret, hidden beneath the clay pastures of Gippsland.
Researchers rescue GGE from flooding
Giant Gippsland Earthworms are a protected species in Victoria. They are very fragile animals and digging up these worms to view them or handling them incorrectly is likely to result in their death. We do not encourage any digging up or handling of these worms unnecessarily. The best way to conserve these worms is to protect their habitat and leave them in their underground homes.
Invert-Eco
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